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Complying With The Revised OSHA Hazard Communication Rule

Compliance Alert

OSHA Publishes Final GHS Rule

It's here!

OSHA has finally published final changes to the Hazcom standard to deal with GHS, i.e., the UN Globally Harmonized System which is designed to coordinate workplace chemical safety regulations across the world.

The key thing you need to know RIGHT NOW: If you're like most employers, the parts of the new standard affecting you most directly are the required changes to Hazcom labels and MSDSs (Material Safety Data Sheets). The good news is that you don't have to comply with these new requirements until Dec. 1, 2013. So you got a lot of time.

GHS Compliance Calendar: Key Dates & Deadlines
OSHA's Revised Hazard Communication Standard Slides

 

Additional Resources
  • Post Image OSHA Publishes Final GHS Rule

    It's here! OSHA has finally published final changes to the Hazcom standard to deal with GHS, i.e., the UN Globally Harmonized System which is designed to coordinate workplace chemical safety regulations across the world. The key thing you need to know RIGHT NOW: If you're like most employers, the parts of the new standard affecting you most directly are the required changes to Hazcom labels and MSDSs (Material Safety Data Sheets). The good news is that you don't have to comply with these new requirements until Dec. 1, 2013.
    So you got a lot of time. Read More...

  • Post Image The GHS Rule and How It Changes HazCom

    On March 26, 2012, OSHA published the final GHS rule in the Federal Register. 90 days from now, May 25, 2012, the GHS rule officially takes effect. In the coming days, weeks and months, SafetySmart Compliance will explain the rule and the things you'll have to do to comply with it. But first, we're going to give you the big picture of what GHS is all about. The GHS Conundrum: Same Hazard(s), Different Rules In the US, millions of workers are exposed to hazardous substances at work. So are workers in Canada, Mexico, Europe, Asia, South America and all over the world. The good news is that most of the world's industrialized nations have adopted regulations to protect workers against these hazards; the bad news is that the rules in each country are different. These national differences compromise both safety and commerce.
    Read More...

  • Post Image 4 Reasons Not to Panic About GHS

    GHS is the most dramatic thing to happen to Hazcom since the OSHA Hazard Communication standard was first published back in 1983.
    But while change is rarely easy, for most of you at least, i.e., the employers that get their hazardous chemicals from manufacturers or importers rather than manufacturing or importing them yourself, the transition to GHS shouldn't be that dramatic.
    Here are 4 reasons why. Read More...

  • Post Image Getting Your Haz Com Program Ready for GHS

    Who Should Read This: This article is for employers that use, handle or store hazardous chemicals and are covered by the OSHA Hazcom standard; it's not for companies that manufacture, import or distribute such chemicals. ----- Now that OSHA finally issued the Final GHS Rule, you face the task of making the transition to GHS. A key task in the transition will be to go through your current workplace Hazard Communication Program (HCP) and revising it to meet GHS requirements.
    Here's what you have to do and when. Read More...

  • Post Image HAZCOM: The GHS Proposal and How It Would Change HazCom

    As you all probably know, a UN initiative called the Global Harmonized System (GHS) for hazard communication would bring all of the world's workplace chemical hazard regulations into one uniform set of rules. That's a cool idea. Of course, it also means that the OSHA HazCom standard you know and love would undergo some changes. Here's an explanation of what GHS is and how it would affect HazCom. How GHS Came About Most of the world's industrialized nations have established a system of chemical hazard regulation that, among other things, requires manufacturers, suppliers and employers to communicate information about the physical properties and dangers of hazardous substances to workers and consumers. (Note: Through the course of this article, the word "substances" refers not just to pure substances but mixtures.) In the U.S., the system is known as HazCom - short for Hazard Communication. Download Now...

  • Post Image The New GHS Rule: The 4 Most Important Changes You Need to Know About

    In case you don't have the time to work through all 858 pages of the Final GHS Rule that OSHA published today, here's a quick briefing of the key changes and how they affect you. 1. MSDSs BECOME SDSs What's Changing: Material Safety Data Sheets will be called Safety Data Sheets - SDSs rather than MSDSs.
    Impact on You: Dropping the "M" from MSDS won't have any substantive impact but will require administrative changes like relabeling your MSDS binders and changing "MSDS" to "SDS" in training materials, policies and programs. Read More...

  • Post Image Is Your Hazcom Program Ready for GHS?

    THE PROBLEM: Section 1910.1200(e)(1) of the OSHA Hazard Communication standard requires employers to "develop, implement and maintain" a written hazard communication program (HCP) at each workplace. This requirement will continue when the new GHS rule goes into full effect. But between now and June 1, 2016, you'll have to make revisions to your HCP to reflect the changes required by GHS. HOW TOOL HELPS SOLVE THE PROBLEM: The following Checklist lists the basic elements that an HCP must include. Using the Checklist will enable you to verify that there's nothing important missing; the boldfaced items are elements required to comply with GHS rules. Make sure you add any site-specific elements you include in your own HCP, e.g., safe work procedures for handling different kinds of hazardous chemicals. Read More...

  • Post Image From Hazcom to GHS

    Now that OSHA finally issued the Final GHS Rule, you face the task of making the transition to GHS. A key task in the transition will be to go through your current workplace Hazard Communication Program (HCP) and revising it to meet GHS requirements. Here's what you have to do and when. Click here if you want more detail about a rule and what you must do to comply with it. 10 Ways GHS Will and Won't Impact Your Current Hazard Communication Program Read More...

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